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Weimaraner – Training 2018-03-20T19:13:39+00:00

Fieldwork

TRAINING

Sweat

TRAINING

Hunting

TRAINING

Fieldwork

TRAINING

Fieldwork, the seemingly simple game with the wind. Field work concerns the work of the dog before the shot. Where the sweat and the fetch work are always work after the shot, field work is thus work for the shot. Fieldwork is the work that is typically meant for standing dogs, and as our dog’s name says it (Weimaraner Standing Dog), this work is very suitable for the Weimaraner. So to summarize the previous sentences you can say about fieldwork: for the shot and seemingly simple. Given that the space here is too limited to discuss the fieldwork as a whole, we limit ourselves to the two bold points.

For the shot

FIELDWORK

The task of the standing dog is to detect and designate the wild game in the field. If the dog has found the wild game and it indicates it, it will remain standing until the hunter is with the dog. If the hunter is with the dog (and not earlier), the game can be shot out of the field, the game goes on the wings and can be shot. After that, the dog may fetch the shot of the game and thus show another piece of work after the shot.

Seemingly simple

FIELDWORK

If you have read the previous passage, the impression may be that fieldwork cannot be really difficult. However, looks can be deceiving, there is a lot to look at and a lot of the dog and the hunter are required. Below are some qualities that the dog needs to possess to be able to do well in the field.

Search

FIELDWORK

A (standing) dog will always be in search against the wind. The dog does this by revamping or flanking. In fact, the dog runs a zigzag pattern over the field, with the dog actually working 90 degrees on the wind and tackling the field against the wind. The dog works against the wind because the dog can smell the best in the field (spray drift). You may imagine that the odors of the game go easily with the wind and that the dog when working against the wind, has the most chance of a good spray drift. The dog should also do this with a high head posture.

Imagine putting the dog in a beet field or a potato field. If the head posture is low, in other words, the dog runs with its nose on the ground, the dog’s head will be out of the wind below the vegetation and can therefore not get a spray drift. All that the dog can smell now can be traces of the wildlife present in the field (foot spray drift).

The hunter will have to ensure that the head posture is as high as possible so that no spray drift is missed and the game-birds will be locked. (More about that later) A very difficult task for the forerunner.

Advance

FIELDWORK

The advance is how a standing dog points to the wild. Usually, the characteristic pose in which the dog is completely stretched with a foreleg up high. Yes, that’s an advance, but it’s not the case that the foreleg should always be up. What actually happens is when the dog gets a spray drift in the middle of a step.

With a fast dog, the game will often be surprised by the dog and lay down on the ground as flat as possible (press). In the meantime, a dog must radiate such an authority that the wildness does not dare to move and stays where it is. (One sometimes claims that the dog is hypnotizing the game).

A young and/or inexperienced dog will initially also advance on walking trails and hot spots (place where the game has just been). However, it is desirable that the dog is in places where 100% sure game-birds are present. Although advance by itself should always be present (advance is almost impossible or not possible at all to teach), the hunter will have to make the dog clear that it is not desirable that the dog advance, in, for example, hot spots. This is to be done by placing the young dog under the game and praising him until he falls down. This does not seem to be difficult, but this is not a simple task for the hunter, even though it is often necessary to drive from field to field and the fact that many kilometers are often worn to train the dog.

Obedience

FIELDWORK

Of course, there must be some appeal on the dog, the dog may not go after its game, when the dog has found a game-birds, and advance he will have to wait for the hunter before the dog is able to go after the game. Also, the dog will have to return to the hunter on a whistle signal, however exciting it may be in the field, this has to do with a particular piece of safety in the field.

If too much obedience is required from the dog, this can result in a dog who does not want to do more searching. Too little obedience, on the other hand, will result in premature push out of the game or the chasing of hares. Here the hunter will have to find a golden middle way. Again no simple task for the hunter.

Flora and Fauna

FIELDWORK

When training a dog in the fieldwork, it is very valuable if not it is necessary to know something about the wild game that one is actually hunting and its natural biotope. Examples of this are: How does a pheasant behave in the beets, where can I find the pheasants in the field and why. If you think of hares, it’s very useful if you can, for example, reason where, for example, a group of hares could be. What problems can I expect in winter wheat or in greenery?

 How do the flora and fauna behave in relation to different wind directions etc. etc. Although this is often a matter of experience, it can help if you look into this. Talk to experienced people, talk to an agricultural worker, these people have to live on their land and, as such, are often a walking source of information. Tell us about local uses, the DO’s and DON’Ts as you please. This prevents someone from stepping on their toes and it is more likely to help you if you comply with the locally valid, often unwritten, habits.